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What Vision Problems are Recognized as a Disability?

By Kenton Koszdin on November 6, 2018 | In Disease SSDI Claim

What Vision Problems are Recognized as a Disability?

Vision problems often make it difficult to work, especially if you have been medically determined as blind. While there are many vision issues that can qualify you for disability benefits, it is important for you to understand the definition of blindness according to the Social Security Administration, as well as what factors are considered when determining whether or not you can work to support yourself due to vision loss.

Disability Benefits for Those Who Are Blind

There are two ways you can be diagnosed as blind according to the Social Security Administration. If your vision cannot be corrected to at least 20/200 vision, either with glasses, corrective surgery, or other vision corrective options, you can be diagnosed as blind. You can also be diagnosed as blind according to Social Security if your field of vision is 20 degrees or less. Both of these diagnoses are made considering the better eye and not both.

Other Vision Disabilities

There are other vision problems that can qualify you for disability benefits as well. There are vision issues ranging from farsightedness to blindness. However, whether or not you qualify for disability benefits based on your vision loss is mostly determined by your ability to earn an income. If your vision problems limit or prevent you from working, you may be eligible for disability benefits. If there are co-exiting health problems that, when coupled with your vision loss, keep you from working, all physical or mental health conditions can be considered when determining your eligibility for benefits.

SSI or SSDI for Vision Disabilities

Whether you qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) largely depends on age, the number of work credits you have earned through working, and even the income of a spouse or parent. If you haven’t worked or haven’t earned enough work credits, you will want to apply for SSI. However, if you qualify for SSDI based on the above factors, you may be able to receive disability benefits.

If your vision loss or blindness keeps you from working, you may be able to apply for disability benefits, whether SSI or SSDI. If you need more information about your eligibility for disability benefits based on your vision, contact Koszdin Law Office for a free consultation. Send us a message or give us a call so we can discuss your case for disability benefits based on your vision loss.

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